Running Around in Circles? What Rats Can Teach Us About Stress…

Wow – at a recent medical conference I was speaking at in Taiwan, a fascinating study came to light you really have to hear about. To save time, here’s the Executive Summary and our own conclusions:

Has stress affected you negatively recently? To find out how you can deal better with stress, fire up energy, boost resilience and build recovery, check out our new book The Wealthy Body in Business (Bloomsbury, London) due out April 6th!

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When the Product Ends Up Different From the Source…

By Tim Bean –

Despite being one of the healthiest products you can eat, would it surprise you to know that not all COCONUT OIL is processed equally?

When buying your coconut oil from the store, always select a product that’s “Organic, Extra Virgin, Cold Pressed.”

This, and other great tips, can be found in our forthcoming new book, “The Wealthy Body in Business” (Bloomsbury, London) due out in April. Watch this space – advanced orders available soon!

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It Ain’t So Hard…

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By Anne Laing –

Common Myths #42: “It’s so hard to change eating habits back after the Christmas period”.

The Facts: Yes, it may feel hard getting back to normal healthy eating again, because festive food and drink is often very addictive.

But you are more than the sum total of just your eating habits.

You can change your behaviours and your choices anytime that cause your physique to be out of shape.

We have up to 100 trillion cells in our bodies, each demanding a constant supply of daily nutrients to function properly. What you eat affects all these cells and their operating ability and therefore every aspect of our being from mood, energy levels, and food cravings, to thinking capacity, sleeping habits, immunity and general health.

You are totally made up by what you eat and drink, how you exercise, how you sleep, and the status of your internal medical biomarkers.

Our body requires essential nutrients to survive and if we keep eating food that is lacking in nutrients our cellular stocks of these become depleted so we slowly start to malfunction. It will become increasingly harder to concentrate and process information as this continues. There is also less energy and it is more difficult for the body to metabolise food and burn fat.

This is why processed, packaged and sweet foods are called anti-nutrients. They are addictive; they literally attack your stores of nutrients and change health for the worse.

Take time to think before you eat, forget the ‘good’ and ‘bad’ foods… think what food the body needs to operate optimally.

Practising this technique will help you naturally make healthy choices based on your bodies needs and once you have got the hang of it you will never have to bother with diets.

Get this right and you’ll have more energy for exercise, sleep better and your internal health will improve.

You see, you can change your choices. Over the last few weeks you’ve learned to behave in a particular way, but you can also unlearn it because persistence, desire and education will always win out over an out-of-shape physique and ill-health.

“Be careful the environment you choose, for it will shape you; be careful the friends you choose, for you will become like them.” – W. Clement Stone, 1902-2002, Author and Businessman

Are You Torching Fat – or Muscle..?

By Tim Bean –

If you have a sedentary job and thinking of introducing exercise into your daily routine – that’s a great move. But it’s important to get the right balance.

New research has added strength to the case for adding strength to your frame, by lifting heavy weights…

Dude, you’re doing that wrong …

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By Anne Laing –

When travelling abroad we still see business people at the hotel breakfast buffet loading up with their morning fruit juice, in the mistaken belief they’re making a healthy choice. For sure it’s healthier than a soda, but not by much…

For a day of high productivity, performance and concentration most juices are no help to your brain health. Commercial juices contain a large amount of refined carbohydrates guaranteed to give you a concentration slump. Each 12-ounce glass of juice has about the same amount of sugar (8 teaspoons) as a 12-ounce glass of soda, even if no sugar is added.

According to Dr Mercola, international health expert, these juices may also be contaminated with mould and should best be avoided.

Sports drinks, such as Gatorade, should also be left well alone, as one of their main ingredients is high-fructose corn syrup, and others may contain large amounts of caffeine per serving.

To fire up your neurons eat a piece of whole fruit or half a cup of dark berries, which appear in their own natural, high-fibre package. Alternatively go for green or purple fresh-made smoothies, tomato juice, fresh-squeezed lemon juice with sparkling water, coconut water, mineral water, or herbal teas…!

Planning ahead, you can also grab an apple or banana from the buffet to slip in your briefcase as emergency rations for later in the day!

A Recipe for Myopia

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Being in business we are always glued to some screen or another.

Yet the addiction to the screen use goes beyond its attention-grabbing nature and the business of business. Screen-time creates a very near and static focal length for our eyes. The ciliary muscle in the eye relaxes when looking into the distance, and it contracts at shorter focal lengths.

Gazing at a screen for hours on end is effectively practicing constant contraction of the ciliary muscle.  Too much ‘near’ work, in the absence of ‘mid-range’ and ‘distance’ work, influences the progression of myopia (short sightedness)

Being office bound reduces time spent outside, which is also suggested to lead to myopia.

Based on epidemiological studies, Ian Morgan, a myopia researcher at the Australian National University in Canberra, estimates that children needed to spend around three hours per day under light levels of at least 10,000 lux to be protected against myopia.

When outdoors, the eye becomes accustomed to long viewing distances, and this has a protective effect. This ability was essential for primeval man to perceive hidden danger, changes in terrain and weather patterns in order to survive.

When the eye is exposed to bright light, the retina releases dopamine. Dopamine signals the eye to change from night vision, which relies on rod-shaped photoreceptors, to day vision mode.  Day vision utilises cone-shaped photoreceptors, which also provide colour sensitivity.  When there isn’t enough of the right light, this cycle gets disrupted.

Overcast days may provide less than 10,000 lux – even outdoors – but sunny days can provide much more than that, even if you’re wearing sunglasses. Indoor settings typically max out at about 500 lux, so make sure you get out of the office, and into the bright light of day as often as you can.

Nature 519,276–278 (19 March 2015) International weekly journal of science http://www.nature.com/news/the-myopia-boom-1.17120

Where Have All The Oranges Gone…?

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Orange segments are a healthy and easy-to-eat snack for children during rugby half time break (or any sport for that matter).  Oranges are loaded with vitamin C, which helps counter the effects of oxidation and stress. This marvellous fruit has fibre and carbohydrates in the right mix, and provides children with fuel and stamina.

Eating orange halves at half time will also help keep your child hydrated, as oranges have high water content – unlike lollies.

Sadly we now see coaches of junior sports teams handing out sweets and candy bars like confetti.  Concentrated sugar in the body, such as in sweets, always come with adverse biological reactions in a child’s body, whether it is obvious or not.  Visible reactions can go from a hyper-active sugar “high” – through to irrational and violent behaviour, often ending in extreme lethargy and fatigue.  Not what a coach wants to see in his or her team!

Chemical ingredients in sweets and sweet drinks (as many so-called ‘sports’ drinks are) will also cause certain children to have adverse and uncharacteristic reactions to the preservatives, colourings, flavourings and stabilisers they are laced with.

If a child’s overall diet is well balanced, there should be no adverse dental issues with eating oranges at half time – which seems to be the main argument for this shameful change.  This is one area where dentists seem united, indicating that children are far better off eating oranges or other healthy snacks rather than sweets, soft drinks, sports drinks, etc, during and after the game.

Prof. Grant Schofield explains, “I’d say most professional sports teams are now at least [consuming] low sugar or low carb. That’s not always high fat, but it’s healthy fats. Nutrition for sport is really changing fast.”

If the All Blacks have shunted sugar aside, deleting it from their training foods, why can’t this filter down to our children, the most damaged by these pseudo-foods..?

Alternative Snack Ideas for the Sportsground…

Ryvita & Peanut Butter

Almonds, Walnuts, Brazils – or trail mix (careful of children with nut allergies).

Fig Bars

Oatmeal biscuits

Organic Yogurt and berries

Bananas

Orange slices

Clementines/Mandarins

Melon skewers and slices (watermelon, cantaloupe, etc)

Apple slices

Strawberries

Apricots

Peaches

Kiwi fruit

Carrot sticks

– even Hard Boiled Eggs..!